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Everybody’s Got a Name

$ 9.99

Greg's most recent combo recording (2007). Featuring guitar trio, piano quartet, and a guitar-piano duet- 7 originals and 4 standards.

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Product Description

Liner

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Reviews

  1. :

    “…His straight-ahead, coolly swinging sound is heard in trio and quartet arragnements on this release, mostly originals with a jam-session feel… Chako hits paydirt when his band lets loose in the bustling, trickily constructed title track, and when he gets lost in the emotion of the sparkling All Roads Lead Home…” – JazzTimes `08

  2. :

    “…this album swings hard and gentle, depending on the track… Greg Chako has some of the nimblest fingers I’ve ever heard! The backing by his trio is superb and very tight, so you have a muscular sound wrapped in gloves of velvet. In British English slang this is a band giving it some serious welly and taking no prisoners. If your feet aren’t at least tapping when listening to this album you have to be braindead! Definitely one the best jazz albums I’ve heard in recent times”. – http://www.mpeters77.freeserve.co.uk/musicwatch11.html

  3. :

    “…his last few releases have placed him among the elite jazz guitarists in America… The musicians have good chemistry… You will enjoy his buttery tone on guitar in both trio and quartet formats…” – D. Oscar Groomes, O’s Place

  4. :

    “Superb,” “exquisite” and “delicious” are three words that only begin to describe Greg Chako’s ninth and latest release, Everybody’s Got A Name. Chako’s superb playing, exquisite interpretations and delicious melodies, combined with his impeccable ear for melody, lend an understated elegance to each of the album’s 11 tracks. He guides his listeners through the world of Jazz guitar with tunes that range from bop compositions to sultry Bossa Nova, all the while gracing each song with his unique style of playing. There’s something fresh about each of the songs. Chako has a cool and confident style of playing, with superior ease and grace… Not only does he show just what he is made of, but his band mates strut their stuff, too; their flawless musicianship is evident throughout the album, but they excel on the title track. In his liner notes he confesses, “As the title track, I wanted to write something that shows off the group.” With this in mind, Chako wrote a complex, forward, unpredictable, yet clean musical rebuttal to the Jazz professionals and critics who, “overemphasize ‘name’ recognition…” He says, “…Everybody’s got a name, or, everybody who’s got something uniquely valid to say has a right to be taken seriously.” Mark my words, ladies and gentlemen; this is one fellow we should all take seriously… The other star of this album is “The Lamp is Low.” Based on Ravel’s “Pavane pour une Infante defunte,” a Classical piece, Chako and his trio effortlessly execute this dreamy Bossa Nova version. Chako’s smooth guitar playing leaves a velvety aftertaste in the listener’s mouth, and the tender melody lingers long after the song ends. You’ll want to play this one on repeat. You’ll probably want to play a few others over and over again, too. Do yourself a favor and listen to Everybody’s Got A Name. Greg Chako and his band members prove they definitely have something to say, and they’re worth listening to. Rating: 9 on a scale of 1 to 10 http://www.music-reviewer.com/may-2008/jazz-blues-other/greg-chako-::-everybodys-got-a-name/

  5. :

    Greg Chako – EVERYBODY’S GOT A NAME: We first reviewed Greg’s music a couple of issues back (#77) on his “PAINT A PICTURE, TELL A STORY” CD (which we made a “PICK” for that issue). We like this album very much as well, though it has a much more “uptown” kind of flavor, at least to my ears. It still features Greg’s fantastic guitar works, & though he’s joined by Mark DeRose (percussion, drums), Yasuhiro Hasekawa’s bass & piano by Hiroshi Tanaka, there seems to be more emphasis on Chako’s guitar this time. Now, don’t get me wrong, you can still hear the other players, it (somehow) just seems like Greg’s playing is more “in front” on these tracks than on the earlier CD. Some of that may be attributable to the fact that the players are those that Greg played with (most often) while he lived in Japan… & it’s clear that he GOT the concept for this CD “right on”… doesn’t matter if the player has “big name” recognition… ‘coz, as the album title implies – “everyone has a NAME”! He added some funny touches to the CD jacket (but you’ll have to purchase it to see what they are, eh?). Ah, NOW I hear some more piano (title track), & Mr. Tanaka can SMOKE, volkz! The more I listen through the compz on this album, the more it “sticks” to my ribs… there are some very strong tunes here, most notably (& my favorite on the CD) being “Yamanashi Snow”… a very haunting piece… starts off slow, with nice jazz orientation & a genuine “hook” for the listener to carry away with them (for years, I might add). This one rates our MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, and (once again) the “PICK” of this issue for “most creative flow in a jazz recording”. – Rotcod Zzaj

  6. :

    “Chako has a full sound, with hints of Wes Montgomery. Excellent contemporary bop, chunks of Latin, some post-bop aesthetics and as the album progresses, Chako explores more contemplative pieces built off of a pastoral tradition, straight-up swinging pieces, a bit of Jobim’s bossa nova, and a quiet duet with Hiroshi Tanaka on piano (with what might be a Bill Evans influence in his phrasing). Covering all of the fundamental bases here, the playing is really fine. The rhythm section is outstanding, moving from style to style with ease and providing more than just rhythmic accompaniment. Moreover, Chako’s stretching out further here than in previous releases — exploring and developing, taking influences into account and not just adding some personal effect to the playing, but adding a personal effect that coalesces with the influences in a better way”. – All Music Guide – by Adam Greenberg

  7. :

    “Going back and forth between a trio and quartet lineups, guitarist Greg Chako has returned once again with a great album called Everybody’s Got A Name. What I liked about him before was his sense of character, giving each song a voice (or a metaphorical “face”) and having it become the reason you want to hear the entire song. Chako is in good company as he plays his heart and soul out with material that benefits his style of playing, especially in songs like “Bop-N-Swing Thing”, “Blues For Redd”, “Yamanashi Snow” and the Latin-flavored title track, which doesn’t let go of its energy during the song’s 10 minute duration. The music feels good, you listen to it and can’t help but smile throughout, and it seems that these guys may have been doing it the same way in the studio. It works, and I think this guy is going to and will continue to record music that people will find hard to resist.”

  8. :

    “Greg Chako is a fabulous jazz guitarist. When you listen to his new CD you hear elements of jazz guitar greats such as Herb Ellis, Howard Roberts, Barney Kessel, Tony Mottola and Tal Farlow, to name a few. The guitar of Chako, drums of Derose, and upright bass of Hasegawa play as one unit, and the piano work of Hiroshi Tanaka really stands out. It’s an exceptional jazz CD and recommended listening.” – Metro Spirit – AUGUSTA, GA 4/2/08 BY RICH MCCRACKEN II

  9. :

    “…fluid jazz played with integrity and style. Chako’s ninth full-length release is a keeper. This CD features eleven classy, reserved compositions that really showcase this guy’s skills on the guitar. His intricate playing recalls some of the jazz greats from the 50s and 60s and his backing musicians provide the perfect rhythmic backdrop. There are so many self-released CDs that just don’t cut it. Everybody’s Got a Name is clearly an exception to the rul

  10. :

    “Guitarist/composer Greg Chako is the consummate musician who, despite personal hardships in his life, dedicates himself to the art of jazz with every fiber of his being, producing one fine album after another. With only three standards on the program, the majority of the music presented on Everybody’s Got a Name features original compositions and arrangements. As good as past recordings were, this work is perhaps Chako’s best release yet. Just one listen

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